Art and Crafts Odisha

Art and Crafts of Odisha


Odisha is known for its wide range of art and crafts, where each village practices some kind of art or craft forms for their livelihood and passion. Odisha is famous for its traditional arts and crafts since time immemorial; it’s other name “Utkal” signifies the significance of the same. Because the etymological derivation of the term i.e. “Ut” and “Kala” roughly refers to excellence of art. Hence, the term Utkal is aptly appropriate for this state. 


Some Major Art and Crafts are: 


Bamboo Craft - Bamboo Craft Traditional crafts using bamboo as raw material. Rural people in general are both producers and consumers of this product. Bamboo has manifold uses, its low cost making it the primary material for articles of everyday use such as stools, mats, baskets, traps as well as decorative items. It is important both in life and after death. It is used for building houses, as well as to make ladders and scaffolds for building and repairing houses. 


Location: 

Paralakhemundi, Gajapati District 

Baipariguda: Keraput village, Koraput District 

Nuaguda, Nawarangpur District 


Bandha Textile - Odisha Ikat is a kind of ikat, a resist dyeing technique, originating from Indian state of Odisha. Also known as "Bandha of Odisha", it is a geographically tagged product of Odisha since 2007. It is made through a process of tie-dying the warp and weft threads to create the design on the loom prior to weaving. It is unlike any other ikat woven in the rest of the country because of its design process, which has been called "poetry on the loom". This design is in vogue only at the western and eastern regions of Odisha; similar designs are produced by community groups called the Bhulia, Kostha Asani, and Patara. The fabric gives a striking curvilinear appearance. Saris made out of this fabric feature bands of brocade in the borders and also at the ends, called anchal or pallu. Its forms are purposefully feathered, giving the edges a "hazy and fragile" appearance. Ikat's equivalent usage in Malay language is mengikat, which means "to tie or to bind". 


Location: 

Sonepur, Balangir (Bargarh Dostrict) 

Nuapatna and Maniabandha Weavers Village, Tigiria (Cuttack District) 

Barpali (Sambalpur District) 

Padmanavpur Village: Ganjam (near Taptapani Hot Spring)


Betel nut Craft- The craft involves cutting the dried betel nut into various shape and size using a vice. Detailed intricate designs are then carved on the same. The carved betel are then painted where the subject various from animal figures to emblems. 


Location: 

Berhampur, Belaguntha (Ganjam District) 


Bomkai Textile - Modern in Design with Traditional Tinge Bomkai cotton sarees are mostly accepted for habitual wear and the silk sari is put on ceremonies and sacred occasions. Most of the stylish saree are embodied with captivating color to give the gracious look to the woman wearing the saree. The ancient belief is depicted in its border Mostly the design of fish is seen in the sari as it is believed to be a sign of success and affluence. The most charming part is its thread work in the designs of the border and the palloo. The appearance of the saree is related to simplicity and has a tribal tinge in it. The sari is normally dyed to attain the red, black and white background colours. However, today you will find the sari in several designs and multiple colours while retaining their originality. The warps are suitably woven to produce multicoloured end piece. 


Location: 

Bomkai village, Ganjam District 


Brass Craft - flexible fish and wood - The flexible brass fish of Odisha is a very ancient craft form which dates back up to 9th century AD during the rule of the Bhanja Kings but mainly received recognition during 1658 AD to 1707 AD which is around 300 years ago. It is said to have originated in the area of Bellaguntha and is believed that a person named Gangadhar Maharana was the first person who started the making of this art form. The main attraction of these artifacts is the life like smooth movement. When this craft was first started fishes were the only products that were being created, in today’s market you can find other creatures like prawns, snakes and tortoises. 


Location: 

Bellaguntha Village, Ganjam District 


Coconut shell - (Nadia carving) Coconut shell is the strongest part covered in coconut fruit. Coconut shell is located in between the coconut flesh and coconut husk. This shell is naturally created to protect the inner part of coconut. This shell is use to produce various handicrafts applies and other applications. Most of handmade decorative are created by using coconut shell due to their strength. Instead of wasting the coconut shell re-utilize the coconut shell by making artistic craft like hanging painted coconut. Coconut shell painting is a fascinating craft and also people use for worship. Coconut shell painting, usually involves acrylic colours which have good properties. Acrylic paint is a fast drying paint containing pigment suspension in acrylic polymer emulsion. Acrylic paints can be diluted with water, but become water-resistant when dry. 


Location:

Berhampur, Belaguntha (Ganjam District) 


Cowdung toys - These toys are prepared by using husk , cow dung and lime powder. These toys are prepared by using husk , cow dung and lime powder. These toys are prepared by using husk , cow dung and lime powder. 


Location: 

Mathura, Ganjam District 

Koraput District Nawarangpur District 

Raghurajpur, Puri District


Dhokra - meta casting - Dhokra (also spelt Dokra) is non–ferrous metal casting using the lost-wax casting technique. This sort of metal casting has been used in India for over 4,000 years and is still used. One of the earliest known lost wax artifacts is the dancing girl of Mohenjo-daro. The product of dhokra artisans are in great demand in domestic and foreign markets because of primitive simplicity, enchanting folk motifs and forceful form. Dhokra horses, elephants, peacocks, owls, religious images, measuring bowls, and lamp caskets etc., are highly appreciated. Dhokra Damar tribes are the main traditional metalsmiths of West Bengal and Odisha. Their technique of lost wax casting is named after their tribe, hence Dhokra metal casting.

 

Location: 

Narsinghpur, Anubhul, Baramba (Cuttack District) 

Sadeibereni village, Dhenkanal District 

Kuliana Ranibandh, Sarisha Kotha (Mayurbhanj District) 

Phulbani District 

Dasapala, Rayagada District 


Ganjappa / ganjifa cards – painting - Ganjifa cards are circular or rectangular, and traditionally hand-painted by artisans. The game became popular at the Mughal court, and lavish sets were made, from materials such as precious stone-inlaid ivory or tortoise shell (darbar kalam). The game later spread to the general public, whereupon cheaper sets (bazâr kalam) would be made from materials such as wood, palm leaf, stiffened cloth or pasteboard. Typically Ganjifa cards have coloured backgrounds, with each suit having a different colour. Different types exist, and the designs, number of suits, and physical size of the cards can vary considerably.

 

Location: 

Parla Khemundi, Ganjam Districrt 

Raghurajpur, Puri District. 


Kotpad saree - Kotpad handloom fabric is the first item from Odisha that received the Geographical Indication of India tag, in 2005. The Mirgan community of Kotpad is famous for their exquisite organic dyed textile. They usually weave this textile for "Bhotada", "Dharua" and other motifs of their neighboring tribal communities. 


Location: 

Kotpad, Koraput District 


Leather - katki chappal- As per the traditional and modern demands of the people, footwear’s are made in various designs. The Ethnic Footwear’s are made according to the requirements of the customers. This type of chappal, which serves multi-purpose, is mainly used in villages, deriving the name “Ethnic Footwear”. This chappal is prepared with leather/velvet upper. Embroidery work is done on the upper which is stitched on to the leather sole. This chappal is made completely as one piece. This is without lace so it is easy to wear and remove. It is famous among the people of Rajasthan and is known as “Jodhpuri chappals”. Since Madhya Pradesh is bordering Rajasthan, about 90% of the people of MP in villages also use these chappals. According to the liking and demands of customers, various colours and designs of these chappals are made. Wearing these chappals has become fashion, including special occasions like marriages and festivals. 


Location: 

Baran, Cuttack District 


Metal Crafts and wares - kasa & pital kaam - The people those who are engaged in the profession of bell metal work are normally known as the Kansaries. But the nomenclature “Kansari” has also different names in different places of Odisha. From ancient time, the artisans of Odisha knew the scientific process of preparing an alloy of zinc and brass known as bell-metal. The daily utility utensils are produced in artistic designs. It is a custom in Odisha to give some utility utensils of Bell-metal during the daughter's marriage. 


Location: 

Toroba, Balangir District 

Remuna, Balasore District 

Bhatimunda, Cuttack District 

Bhuban, Mikan, Indipur, Okherma, Karamal, gopalpurpatna village (Dhenkanal District) 

Parla Khemundi, Gajapati Jagmohan, Mamudia, Devbhumi, Mathura, Kabli Surya Nagar, Nuapentha, Patrapur, Dhabra, Belaguntha, Berhampur (Ganjam District) 

Gunpur, Sahara (Rayagada District) 

Podar Sahi, Phulbani District 

Balakati, Bainchua i Rajsunalhal, Brahmgiri, Itamati (Puri District) 

Jigidihi, Rayagada District 


Paddy and root craft - A Craft unknown, a culture unrevealed and a skill untapped. The paddy craft, Dhanamurti of Orissa is a languishing craft which is practised in the tribal district of Odisha. The unhusked rice grains are beautifully strung together by our finest craftsman to make religious idols, gaatha, carts, chariots, elephants and other Gods and Goddess brings you closer to such bliss and magnificence, in the rawest from. The Dhanamurti is a beatiful add-on to your space. Rice being a symbol of prosperity, the light weight and bright-colored Dhanamurti bringing about an aura of culture and richness of tribal Odisha. 


Location: 

Kumudipadar, Titilagarh, Saraiba hal (Balangir District) 

Dumermunda, Kalahandi District 

Jhaliaguda, Nawarangpur District


Palm leaf engraving - Talapatra khodai : Palm leaf has long been used to make auspicious recordings, including religious texts and horoscopes. In Odisha, artists used to paint directly on the palm leaves cut to the required size. The tradition of painting snippets from religious texts or incidents continues even today. The palm leaf paintings are now being made more user-friendly to attract modern buyers. Greeting cards, bookmarks and other decorative items make lasting souvenirs and gifts. 


Location: 

Raghurajpur, Puri District 


Papier-mache mask – Mukha - Papier Mache literally means chewed paper or pulped paper. It is a composite material consisting pieces of paper or pulp, sometimes reinforced with textiles, bound with an adhesive such as glue and starch. The process involved in these sculpts is as intricate as it gets. Waste cloth, paper and various natural fibers are soaked at first following which the combined pulp is beaten and mixed with a variety of seeds and gums. This treatment gives it strength and protects it from termites. Special clays as well as bio-wastes are also added for body and reinforcement. This whole process gives rise to a medium so malleable that it can be molded into innumerable forms. 


Location: 

Ganjam District 


Patachitra Painting - Pattachitra artform is known for its intricate details as well as mythological narratives and folktales inscribed in it. Some of the popular themes represented through this art form are Thia Badhia - depiction of the temple of Jagannath; Krishna Lila - enactment of Jagannath as Lord Krishna displaying his powers as a child; Panchamukhi - depiction of Lord Ganesh as a five-headed deity. 


Location: 

Raghurajpur, Puri District 

Ganjam District 


Pipili applique work - The word ‘Applique‘ would ring a bell in the minds of all fashion enthusiasts. It is nothing but weaving colourful and attractive designs cut out from one cloth onto another. Something trending in our fashion industry right? But guess what… applique works were part of art forms of Orissa from years before. Initially, to decorate chariots for the ‘Ratha Yatra’ at Jagannath Temple, Puri. This temple art has been passed over generations and is practised by skilled artisans at Pipli, a small village near Bhubaneswar. Apart from serving temples, they also create a wide range of utilitarian and decorative items. These include wall hangings, clutches, lampshades, and even handbags. 


Location: 

Pipili, Puri District 

Kanchana, Ganjam District 


Sea shell craft - Seashell is an exoskeleton of marine mollusks such as snails, clams, oysters, etc., which is a hard outer protective layer. These seashells are formed in layers and are composed of calcium carbonate with a less quantity of protein (not more than 2%). Seashells are normally found in beach drift, which is natural waste matter left along strandlines on beaches by the waves and the tides. Some of these seashells such as oyster shells are used as soil conditioner in horticulture. Shells of Turbinella pyrum (the holy shanka) are reflected to be sacred to the god Vishnu 


Location: 

Puri District 


Silverware – Chanditarkashi - Filigree is the delicate kind of craftwork where the silver strings are modified in a shape of jewelry, models, and showpieces as well. The artists involved with this filigree work are called “Rupa Banias” or “Roupyakaras” (in Odia). They are actually highly mastered traditional goldsmiths in which some of them have their family business, some are self-employed or some do it as casual workers. Since the beginning, the filigree work of Cuttack is caste and hereditary based. Currently, the Bania caste is mostly engaged in this work and few from the fisherman community are also seen to be doing this job for the sake of bread-winning. There are three types of famous filigree works i.e. rose work, siko work, and jari work. The craftsmen manufacture the silver webs though their hands and some metal bending tools. The process of manufacturing filigree is very peculiar in nature. 


Location: 

Cuttack District 

Puri District 


Stone carving - Stone carving is an activity where pieces of rough natural stone are shaped by the controlled removal of stone. Owing to the permanence of the material, stone work has survived which was created during our prehistory. Work carried out by paleolithic societies to create stone tools is more often referred to as knapping. Stone carving that is done to produce lettering is more often referred to as lettering. The process of removing stone from the earth is called mining or quarrying. Stone carving is one of the processes which may be used by an artist when creating a sculpture.

 

Location: 

Balasore District 

Cuttack District

Sukhapada, Jeypore District

Khandagiri, Bhubaneshwar (Khordha District) 

Puri District


Strawcraft - Jirala, a small village in Odisha’s Dhenkanal district, is synonymous with straw painting today. The artist shows a painting with a scene of a village where farmers are getting ready for a new crop season on the occasion of Akshaya Tritiya. “The Kandarpa Ratha and Jagannath Besha themes are famous among buyers,” says the artist 


Location: 

Bhuban block, Jiral (Dhenkanal District) 


Terracotta – Kumbarkhama – Terracotta "baked earth" a type of earthenware, is a clay-based unglazed or glazed ceramic, where the fired body is porous. Terracotta is the term normally used for sculpture made in earthenware, and also for various practical uses including vessels (notably flower pots), water and waste water pipes, roofing tiles, bricks, and surface embellishment in building construction. The term is also used to refer to the natural brownish orange color of most terracotta, which varies considerably. 


Location: 

Barpali, Bargarh District

Cuttack District

Ganjam District

Santeiput village, Koraput District

Nawarangpur District

Dhoapara, Sambalpur District 

Sonepur District

Bhubaneswar ( Near SUM Hospital)


Pottery - Pottery is the process and the products of forming vessels and other objects with clay and other ceramic materials, which are fired at high temperatures to give them a hard, durable form. Major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. The place where such wares are made by a potter is also called a pottery.  


Location: 

Barpali, Bargarh District

Bhubaneswar Museum ( Near Khandagiri)

Cuttack District

Ganjam District

Santeiput village, Koraput District

Nawarangpur District

Dhoapara, Sambalpur District 

Sonepur District



Wood carving – kathokama - Wood carving is a form of woodworking by means of a cutting tool (knife) in one hand or a chisel by two hands or with one hand on a chisel and one hand on a mallet, resulting in a wooden figure or figurine, or in the sculptural ornamentation of a wooden object. The phrase may also refer to the finished product, from individual sculptures to hand-worked mouldings composing part of a tracery. The making of sculpture in wood has been extremely widely practiced, but survives much less well than the other main materials such as stone and bronze, as it is vulnerable to decay, insect damage, and fire. It therefore forms an important hidden element in the art history of many cultures. 


Location: 

Cuttack District

Ganjam District

Raghurajpur, Puri District





Contact for More Details...